Jaye Austin

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The Jane Austen Museum is a magical stop for anyone touring the English countryside in search of all things Jane. The Jane Austen Centre. The Jane Austen Centre, situated in the bustling historic town of Bath, is a treasure trove for any Jane Austen fan passing through.

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Jaye Austin Trivia Jaye Austin was born in Los Angeles as Sarah Dixon. Check out other famous celebrities who hail from Los Angeles , United States.

Lilly Ghalichi admin Jan 13, 2 min read. Ella Rose admin Jan 13, 1 min read. Cassandra gave birth to three children while living at Deane: James in , George in , and Edward in In , the family finally took up residence in Steventon.

Henry was the first child to be born there, in He was subject to seizures, may have been deaf and mute, and she chose to send him out to be fostered.

According to Honan, the atmosphere of the Austen home was an "open, amused, easy intellectual" one, where the ideas of those with whom the Austens might disagree politically or socially were considered and discussed.

Cassandra Austen's cousin Thomas Leigh visited a number of times in the s and s, inviting young Cassie to visit them in Bath in The first mention of Jane occurs in family documents on her return, " Never were sisters more to each other than Cassandra and Jane; while in a particularly affectionate family, there seems to have been a special link between Cassandra and Edward on the one hand, and between Henry and Jane on the other.

From until , George Austen supplemented his income by farming and by teaching three or four boys at a time, who boarded at his home. During this period of her life, Austen attended church regularly, socialised with friends and neighbours, [g] and read novels—often of her own composition—aloud to her family in the evenings.

Socialising with the neighbours often meant dancing, either impromptu in someone's home after supper or at the balls held regularly at the assembly rooms in the town hall.

In , Austen and her sister Cassandra were sent to Oxford to be educated by Mrs Ann Cawley who took them with her to Southampton when she moved there later in the year.

In the autumn both girls were sent home when they caught typhus and Austen nearly died. The sisters returned home before December because the school fees for the two girls were too high for the Austen family.

The remainder of her education came from reading, guided by her father and brothers James and Henry. Together these collections amounted to a large and varied library.

Private theatricals were an essential part of Austen's education. From her early childhood, the family and friends staged a series of plays in the rectory barn, including Richard Sheridan 's The Rivals and David Garrick 's Bon Ton.

Austen's eldest brother James wrote the prologues and epilogues and she probably joined in these activities, first as a spectator and later as a participant.

From the age of eleven, and perhaps earlier, Austen wrote poems and stories for her own and her family's amusement.

Among these works are a satirical novel in letters titled Love and Freindship [ sic ], written at age fourteen in , [54] in which she mocked popular novels of sensibility.

Austen's History parodied popular historical writing, particularly Oliver Goldsmith 's History of England When she was around eighteen years old, Austen began to write longer, more sophisticated works.

In August , aged seventeen, Austen started writing Catharine or the Bower , which presaged her mature work, especially Northanger Abbey ; it was left unfinished and the story picked up in Lady Susan , which Todd describes as less prefiguring than Catharine.

This was a short parody of various school textbook abridgements of Austen's favourite contemporary novel, The History of Sir Charles Grandison , by Samuel Richardson.

When Austen became an aunt for the first time at age eighteen, she sent new-born niece Fanny-Catherine Austen-Knight "five short pieces of For niece Jane-Anna-Elizabeth Austen also born in Jane Austen wrote "two more 'Miscellanious [sic] Morsels', dedicating them to [Anna] on 2 June , 'convinced that if you seriously attend to them, You will derive from them very important Instructions, with regard to your Conduct in Life.

Between and aged eighteen to twenty Austen wrote Lady Susan , a short epistolary novel , usually described as her most ambitious and sophisticated early work.

Austen biographer Claire Tomalin describes the novella's heroine as a sexual predator who uses her intelligence and charm to manipulate, betray and abuse her lovers, friends and family.

Tomalin writes:. Told in letters, it is as neatly plotted as a play, and as cynical in tone as any of the most outrageous of the Restoration dramatists who may have provided some of her inspiration It stands alone in Austen's work as a study of an adult woman whose intelligence and force of character are greater than those of anyone she encounters.

According to Janet Todd, the model for the title character may have been Eliza de Feuillide , who inspired Austen with stories of her glamorous life and various adventures.

Eliza's French husband was guillotined in ; she married Jane's brother Henry Austen in When Austen was twenty, Tom Lefroy , a neighbour, visited Steventon from December to January He had just finished a university degree and was moving to London for training as a barrister.

Lefroy and Austen would have been introduced at a ball or other neighbourhood social gathering, and it is clear from Austen's letters to Cassandra that they spent considerable time together: "I am almost afraid to tell you how my Irish friend and I behaved.

Imagine to yourself everything most profligate and shocking in the way of dancing and sitting down together. Austen wrote in her first surviving letter to her sister Cassandra that Lefroy was a "very gentlemanlike, good-looking, pleasant young man".

My tears flow as I write at this melancholy idea". Halperin cautioned that Austen often satirised popular sentimental romantic fiction in her letters, and some of the statements about Lefroy may have been ironic.

However, it is clear that Austen was genuinely attracted to Lefroy and subsequently none of her other suitors ever quite measured up to him. Marriage was impractical as both Lefroy and Austen must have known.

Neither had any money, and he was dependent on a great-uncle in Ireland to finance his education and establish his legal career.

If Tom Lefroy later visited Hampshire, he was carefully kept away from the Austens, and Jane Austen never saw him again. After finishing Lady Susan , Austen began her first full-length novel Elinor and Marianne.

Her sister remembered that it was read to the family "before " and was told through a series of letters. Without surviving original manuscripts, there is no way to know how much of the original draft survived in the novel published anonymously in as Sense and Sensibility.

Austen began a second novel, First Impressions later published as Pride and Prejudice , in She completed the initial draft in August , aged 21; as with all of her novels, Austen read the work aloud to her family as she was working on it and it became an "established favourite".

In November , George Austen wrote to Thomas Cadell , an established publisher in London, to ask if he would consider publishing First Impressions.

Cadell returned Mr. Austen's letter, marking it "Declined by Return of Post". Austen may not have known of her father's efforts.

During the middle of , after finishing revisions of Elinor and Marianne , Austen began writing a third novel with the working title Susan —later Northanger Abbey —a satire on the popular Gothic novel.

Crosby promised early publication and went so far as to advertise the book publicly as being "in the press", but did nothing more.

In December George Austen unexpectedly announced his decision to retire from the ministry, leave Steventon, and move the family to 4, Sydney Place in Bath.

She was able to make some revisions to Susan , and she began and then abandoned a new novel, The Watsons , but there was nothing like the productivity of the years — The years from to are something of a blank space for Austen scholars as Cassandra destroyed all of her letters from her sister in this period for unknown reasons.

She and her sister visited Alethea and Catherine Bigg, old friends who lived near Basingstoke. Their younger brother, Harris Bigg-Wither, had recently finished his education at Oxford and was also at home.

Bigg-Wither proposed and Austen accepted. As described by Caroline Austen, Jane's niece, and Reginald Bigg-Wither, a descendant, Harris was not attractive—he was a large, plain-looking man who spoke little, stuttered when he did speak, was aggressive in conversation, and almost completely tactless.

However, Austen had known him since both were young and the marriage offered many practical advantages to Austen and her family. He was the heir to extensive family estates located in the area where the sisters had grown up.

With these resources, Austen could provide her parents a comfortable old age, give Cassandra a permanent home and, perhaps, assist her brothers in their careers.

By the next morning, Austen realised she had made a mistake and withdrew her acceptance. Anything is to be preferred or endured rather than marrying without Affection".

All of her heroines In , while living in Bath, Austen started, but did not complete, her novel The Watsons.

The story centres on an invalid and impoverished clergyman and his four unmarried daughters. Sutherland describes the novel as "a study in the harsh economic realities of dependent women's lives".

Her father's relatively sudden death left Jane, Cassandra, and their mother in a precarious financial situation. Edward, James, Henry, and Francis Austen known as Frank pledged to make annual contributions to support their mother and sisters.

They spent part of the time in rented quarters in Bath before leaving the city in June for a family visit to Steventon and Godmersham.

They moved for the autumn months to the newly fashionable seaside resort of Worthing , on the Sussex coast, where they resided at Stanford Cottage.

In the family moved to Southampton , where they shared a house with Frank Austen and his new wife. A large part of this time they spent visiting various branches of the family.

On 5 April , about three months before the family's move to Chawton, Austen wrote an angry letter to Richard Crosby, offering him a new manuscript of Susan if needed to secure the immediate publication of the novel, and requesting the return of the original so she could find another publisher.

She did not have the resources to buy the copyright back at that time, [95] but was able to purchase it in Around early Austen's brother Edward offered his mother and sisters a more settled life—the use of a large cottage in Chawton village [k] that was part of Edward's nearby estate, Chawton House.

Jane, Cassandra and their mother moved into Chawton cottage on 7 July The Austens did not socialise with gentry and entertained only when family visited.

Her niece Anna described the family's life in Chawton as "a very quiet life, according to our ideas, but they were great readers, and besides the housekeeping our aunts occupied themselves in working with the poor and in teaching some girl or boy to read or write.

Austen Jaye Austen Jaye is an extremely talented and hard working actor. ABOUT AUSTEN. Austen Jaye's Schedule. COMING SOON! About Austen Jaye A shy boy, Austen grew up in quite neighborhoods in Los Angeles, California.

Videos Coming Soon! Hoping to be light years beyond where you and I are now, at age 59! It was so important for us to show the world that black people are good, capable, civilized, respectable—everything the world persists in thinking we're not.

And today , that need to affirm, "I am somebody," I am not socially dead! Attendant to this is the two-fold liberal progressive insistence that 1 this is all redeemable through positive activism, good will and a recognition of universal human incorporation; and 2 perhaps the most terrifying of all: if I am doing my liberal due diligence, I am immune to implication in the perpetration of such violence.

I think "the theatre" community is often a breeding ground for the bitter contempt of our thoughtful, rigorous artistry; a contempt disguised as "earnest" befuddlement and "loving" support.

JW: I never used to think like that. But now, my thinking is quite different, and it's now possible for me to conceive exactly how, you know?!

I went to a public talkback for one of the UCI shows and asked a question about how racial dynamics were broached during the rehearsal process.

I had observed that, in contrast to the idyllic lovers and noble characters, the black figures were consistently perpetrators of sexual impropriety incest, for example , power abuse, corruption, and so on the play was a well-known mash-up of Greek myths.

I was thoughtful in formulating the question, and even complimentary of the director in the process of posing it. Well, the director not only emailed me to point out the inappropriateness of my question claiming the focus of the talkback was on design rather than on directorial concept , but also confronted the black actors who responded enthusiastically to the question , nonplussed that they had never brought their concerns up in rehearsal—never considering whether they'd felt welcomed to do so!

I see this shaming and rebuking of black people who call out unconscious antiblack racism, as violence. And it is epidemic. And don't you know, that talkback "incident" is apparently still being talked about, yet not a word has ever been spoken directly to me since, except by the actors, about it.

Yet we clearly perceive and suffer it all. And it is devastating and enraging. FW: I think we can give ourselves permission to act.

I think we have the responsibility to be irresponsible. Now, that doesn't mean that you or I can ever or always do that—and what does that really mean?

You know, I remember while I was a grad student, and still doing course work. What's interesting is that I was standing outside the door and the undergrads were walking down the hall it was a large class.

I was team teaching with another grad student and as the undergrads were coming towards us, I could see a kind of dejection in the whites and Asians, and a bounce in the steps of the black kids, you know?

FW: So, they came up to the door and said, " We did that shit, right? I mean, the things that were not being reported were black people around the world who are suffering from Muslim aggression and suffering all this other stuff, yet were still cued in to the energy of a bomb going off that big in the United States.

And so, here I was, so goddamned "educated" that I was going to discipline the energy of the black kids until we found out exactly what happened.

But fortunately, something kicked up in my mind and I just held my palm up and everybody just slapped it on the way in.

FW: But it wasn't groovy, okay, [Laughter] 'cause now I had to teach a class of about 15 whites and Asians who had just seen that shit go down, you know?

But I was, like, wait a minute, if an apartment building or something blew up in Nazi Germany and a bunch of Jews and gentiles around the world were just clapping, they wouldn't say, "Who are the innocent people who died there?

Let's figure out who put the bomb there first So let's just live in the happiness of the violence against the Nazis now, and we'll figure out the other shit later," you know?

But that's a criminal act as a black person. FW: And I'm trying to get to a point where I can perform that without, you know JW: That's right.

And she knows the deal, because being on the street schools you in a whole other way. JW: She knows that there are high stakes for black folks and that, yeah, you've crossed this line, and so now, you're walking into one of the most prized institutions around, so you black people can't avow my signifyin'.

FW: You know where Columbia is. Some people who are reading this might not. It's Harlem, upper west side, but it's all "chichi" now.

And they're pushing the black folks in Harlem further and further north, so there's a lot of angry black people up there.

FW: When I was there, '89 through '91, there were some—and I'm not condoning this, but I'm not not condoning it—but there were black girls in high school who were feeling the pressure of Columbia's presence, just like every other black person in that area feels it.

FW: And they would walk up and down Broadway between 96th and th and they'd stab people with hypodermic needles and say, "I just gave you AIDS.

FW: And that was funny to them. And we'd laugh about that shit in the Black Student Union and the Black Graduate Association, you know? You'd get into class and they'd be like, "Did you hear about that But they've been called AIDS, see.

AIDS is black; black is AIDS. FW: So they said, "Okay, so, we're going to give this back to you. It was just a criminal act. FW: And then, here we are as graduate students and black professors, forced into simply thinking it as a criminal act, in the university, and laughing our heads off at our little block parties.

They would understand, a suicide bomb, well, yeah , they're mad 'cause their shit has been gone for sixty years! Give me that struggle!

I'd be in heaven! JW: And that's the "Boom! You know, what you just recalled made me think about the first time I read The Trial of Dedan Kimathi.

I could picture these two enraged black people in Kenya, who were just pulling the pins out of their proverbial grenades, using words to rail at this stuff—there's that Sexton question again.

And what was important for me, from this side of the ocean, all these years later, is that we know when we talk about "slave time" or "black time," what that means, you know—how much time has passed, yet how time hasn't passed at all— to really recognize that those two young people in still had cause to rage in , when we performed the play.

So that rage was the beacon that kept me on point —that spark , the ignition switch of their treatise—their manifesto.

Not the promise of transcendence or redemption. Their rage was right ful, not right eous , but right indignation. They were building a context around the figure of Dedan Kimathi as someone who was enraged, on the move and able to galvanize black people into a "moment" of action.

The outcome is another story. I mean, first, the British killed him. But more than that, look at the world's relationship to Africa today.

Look at the fact that this play is still relevant. I mean it all speaks for itself. The evidence is all there. James Baldwin's invocation of that biblical phrase, "the evidence of things not seen," for his last book about societal law and jurisprudence and what it really means in relation to black people; the implications of how Wayne Williams was tried for the murders of all those dead black children.

That's what broke Baldwin's heart and his spirit JW: So, those are the things that kept me on point with my direction of The Trial of Dedan Kimathi.

Whatever the machinations surrounding that production—and I am writing about those—I just had to stay true to the vision of those two people in , who are both alive today and still fighting, and to my vision of how best to bring that rage crashing into the strange oblivion of Orange County, California that the UCI campus exemplifies.

So, I had to assume the burden—thinking of Saidiya Hartman's concern with the re-production of violence — of dramatically staging the violence these Kenyans endured.

And in so considering, I chose to abstract away from the literal, for greater and lasting effect. I sat the audience in the midst of it, surrounded and implicated by it, in every way I could think of—I wanted to engulf them in it, in order to render Kimathi's and the Kenyan people's resistance unequivocally present, even in its ephemerality.

Theatre is ephemeral because it comes and goes, it's here and then it's gone. But I wanted to create an immutable palpability within that ephemerality; one that would remain as haunting residue after the stage pictures were gone.

There were a lot of machinations going on around that work in terms of [sigh] the "hopeful" thrust of a lot of the post-colonial discourse—the notion that triumph, possibility and futurity are all awaiting black people.

I had to stay true to my attempt to collapse past and present together in a dramatic and dynamic way—in order to depict the truth—the "history"—of the present.

So that at the end of the play, the audience can't just jump to its feet in a fit of catharsis declaring, "Yes!

Triumph is ours! FW: You did that really well, because you mined the unconscious of that play in a way that I think the playwrights were really happy about.

FW: I mean, it's like the pre-conscious level of the play is kind of like the discourse I encountered in South Africa where people were like, "here's what's happening, but we're going to be free one day.

FW: One of the great things that you did in directing that play and through the table work was to educate the actors about how the paradigm of post-colonial subjugation is mapped onto the paradigm of social death and slavery.

The play knew that intuitively, and you brought it out in the direction. I think that was really, really great.

JW: Thank you, Frank. And I was swimming upstream against the JW: I love the myriad of insights you've provided me about "tyranny.

And the tyranny of positivity is formidable because it has wedded so many of us to this outcome of freedom. What many people still don't understand is that interrogating these notions of freedom is not synonymous with being against freedom JW: That's the grave misapprehension that people have about Afropessimism as a theoretical framing—that we're somehow against freedom; that we think black people are inherently slaves, incapacitated, and so on—when what they need to understand is that the lens of that critique is trained on the world , not on black people; not on their hopes for freedom or their desire to live and be alive.

Those of us who use this framework take black people's multifariousness as givens. Rather, we analyze the terrible tension between those hopes and what bears down devastatingly on them, recognizing that, whether through creative or theoretical literature, including dramatic literature and dramatic practice, we have to stay the course of our ongoing critique, even in the face of its constant quashing.

And that's what I'm doing with my work. JW: Precisely. FW and JW: [Laughter] JW: Listen, I may be generalizing a bit, too, but there do appear to be a good many theatre practitioners who see the kind of close reading and analysis we do as somehow anathema to "true" art.

JW: That's for sure! And there's a price to be paid for that. FW: A big price. I mean I kind of believed in it— JW: I know!

So did I! FW: Ahh FW: Mmm hmm! It is. JW: At every level. JW: Oh, goodness, yes! JW: Exactly! FW: Yeah! FW: Mmm-hmm. FW: We all want to belong.

FW: It's a lot worse today. JW: Yeah.

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